FAQ

· I have a Two-Headed (or Tailed) coin. Is it an error, and what is it worth?

· How are error coins made?

· I have a coin (any denomination) with a Die Crack, or missing letter or number, is this rare, or collectible?

· I have a coin that shows doubling of the letters/numbers/design. Is it a Doubled Die?

· I just found a coin (cent through dollar) that looks like it is gold. What is it?

· I have a discolored (darker or lighter) quarter or dollar. What is it?

· I have a quarter that is copper on one side. What is it?

· I have access to large quantities of coins and currency. I find Off-Centers, Double Strikes, and Clips, Off-Metal coins. How do I sell them?

· I have a Two-Headed (or Tailed) coin. Is it an error, and what is it worth?

The coin you have is known as a “Magician’s Coin”. This is a man-made novelty item that is sold at magic shops and novelty stores for about $5 each.

Today, most two-headed (or tailed) coins are made by cutting out the back (reverse) of one coin, and placing a cut out front (obverse) of another coin into the back of the first piece. Although you might not be able to see it, there will be a tiny thin groove encircling the side that was cut out.

Your coin will also “ring” differently than a normal coin of the same denomination. Balance your coin on your fingertip and tap it with a pen, it will sound “dead” or “dull” compared to the nice “ring” of a normal coin.

You have a fun item, but not a Mint Error coin. Go out and win some bets!

 

 
· How are error coins made?
Error coins are simply the result of coining mistakes made at the mint which escaped detection before leaving the facility in mint sewn bags. There are many types of errors, and to discuss them here would be an exhaustive effort. If you are interested in knowing more about errors, the recently published Error Coin Encyclopedia III by Arnold Margolis and myself would be a good start. Contact me if you’d like to purchase a copy.

· I have a coin (any denomination) with a Die Crack, or missing letter or number. Is this rare or collectible?

Most Die Cracks and Filled Dies on all denominations of coins are very common. Don’t forget every coin struck from a cracked or filled die will be released from the Mint, as the Mint does not consider these as errors. The Mint doesn’t like to make coins with cracks or filled dies, but because of the huge volume they mint each year (about 30 billion total) this is a low priority to the Mint. There are more coins with die cracks than there are collectors!

There are some collectors who like an example of their favorite coin with a die crack or filled die, but they like to find them in circulation themselves or pay a few cents premium to trade with other serious collectors.

Because I deal in Major Mint Error coins only (Off-Center’s, Off-Metals, Double Strikes, Clips, etc.), I do not purchase these coins at all.

· I have a coin that shows doubling of the letters/numbers/design. Is it a Doubled Die?

Probably not. There are many types of doubling i.e.; Mechanical Doubling, Strike Doubling, Ejection Doubling, etc. that are very common and carry no numismatic value.

I do not buy these types of coins unless they are recognized Doubled Dies such as the 1955 Doubled Die cent, 1916 Doubled Die buffalo nickel, or the 1901 Doubled Die Reverse Morgan silver dollar.

· I just found a coin (cent through dollar) that looks like it is gold. What is it?

If your coin is a bright shiny deep gold color, it has probably been plated outside of the Mint (man-made). Such coins are sold in Sunday Supplement Ads for $3-$5 each as novelty items.

If the edge of the coin is also gold, it has been plated. If the edge shows a nickel or copper color there is a possibility that you have a Mint Error coin. I would have to see the coin to determine its authenticity.

· I have a discolored (darker or lighter) quarter or dollar. What is it?

Chances are your coin is simply toned, discolored or altered. A lot of things happen to coins once they are in circulation. Most people would like to believe their coin is unusual, but odds are it is not an Error coin.

· I have a quarter that is copper on one side. What is it?

Since 1965 our dimes, quarters, halves, and dollars are made of “clad” material. This is a copper core surrounded on both sides by a cupro-nickel layer.

Very often the clad layer peels off the coin before or after it is struck. On dimes and pre-1999 quarters, “Missing Clad Layers” are worth between $10-$25. On States quarters, depending on the condition of the coin and the color of the copper side, they are worth between $100- $200. Do not clean your coin – especially the copper side. I do purchase these coins on a regular basis and would have to see your coin to give you a firm offer.

· I have access to large quantities of coins and currency. I find Off-Centers, Double Strikes, Clips, and Off-Metal coins. How do I sell them?

For 33 years I have been the nation’s strongest buyer of all Major Mint Error coins. I buy from Bank Tellers, Counting Room personnel, and the lucky person who finds a Mint Error coin in a roll or their pocket change.

Because Error coins look very different, I must see the coin to determine its authenticity, and to give you a firm buy price based upon my examination of your coin(s). I buy over 50,000 Mint Error coins each year, and because I have a large customer base I can pay top dollar.

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